Richard Chamberlain Harbord – died 23 March 1937
Daisy Irene Harbord – died 17 January 1939 

This plot sits at the edge of the cemetery.  Interred in the two plots are Capt R Harbord and his wife Daisy.

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The, 23 March 1937, Evening Post reported

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The Southland Times, 18 July 1918, reported his appointment as second pilot at Bluff

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Seven years earlier, at the age of 28, he had been appointed third pilot

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In between those appointments, in 1914, his wife, Daisy Irene, gave birth to their only child – a son.

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During 1914 he also received word from his brother, Lieutenant Harbord, R.N, that Bluff would receive a visit from the Foster Stackhouse expedition visiting the Antartica.

In what was no doubt a stressful time, an inquiry into an incident involving the steamer Westmoreland found Capt Harbord not at fault.

He served on the committee of the Bluff Horticultural Society and fulfilled a vital, and challenging, role as pilot.  He offered insight and advice on the replacing of the tug, Theresa Ward.

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Capt Harbord boarded the stricken barque Okta after it hit the Pelham Rocks in 1913.

He is listed as fourth officer on the Rakaia from London in October 1909.

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Richard Chamberlain Harbord married Daisy Irene Crozier in 1912.

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As part of the National Reserve, he was appointed a role at the beginning of WW1

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His military file lists him as 5’3″ with brown hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion.  He was offered the position of second pilot in 1918.

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He was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, as was his mother

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In 1921 he was appointed a JP.  He is shown to have visited New Zealand 3 times: 1908,1910,1911.  He was involved with the Boy Scouts movement.

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R.C Harbord’s only child, William Leslie, passed away on his 46th birthday.  William was buried in Palmerston North at the Kelvin Grove Cemetery.

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